Baked White Beans With Bacon

This is one of my wife’s favorite recipes. We used to serve by the gallon at a school festival where she and I worked on a barbecue booth. There’s one problem with it: it takes forever to cook. But it needs very little tending, and it’s a great break from good old red beans and rice. This recipe makes enough for a big picnic or family gathering, but you can cut everything in half for a more modest serving. Read More. . .

Read On...

Moo-Shu Pork
* NOMenu.com

Moo-Shu Pork

Moo-shu pork is one of the most elegant, subtle dishes in the Mandarin style of Chinese cookery. It sounds complex but is not really difficult to make. The more exotic ingredients are available at the several Oriental groceries around town. Read More. . .

Read On...

Roasted Pork Shank (Schweinshaxe)
Pork

Roasted Pork Shank (Schweinshaxe)

Roasted Pork Shank (Schweinshaxe) Middendorf’s begins its annual, month-long Oktoberfest celebration this week, which gives us the opportunity to think about some of those long-cooked, rib-sticking dishes we usually see in New Orleans only at Oktoberfest. This one is a particular classic, but it takes some bravery not only to cook but to eat it. At least it does if you leave the rind on. You need a big knife and some perseverance, but the trouble is worth it. It’s also possible to serve these ham shanks denuded of the…

Read On...

Boudin Blanc
Pork

Boudin Blanc

This is not a hard recipe to make–if you have the equipment and ingredients. But not many people do. Sausage casing is not easy to come by, unless you want a mile of it. You might be able to get a small quantity from a supermarket that makes its own sausages. Then there’s the pork liver, which is a special-order item in most markets. You need a meat grinder, although a food processor will do a passable job. Finally, if you want to stuff the sausage in the casings, you need the gizmo for doing that. Read More. . .

Read On...

Open-Mouth Pork Chop
* NOMenu.com

Open-Mouth Pork Chop

This variation on stuffed pork chops is so off-center that I had to call it something else. Do not be distressed that the stuffings want to fall out; there’s no avoiding this other than by using toothpicks to hold the chop together during the cooking. Read More. . .

Read On...

Pulled Barbecued Pork Shoulder
* NOMenu.com

Pulled Barbecued Pork Shoulder

Pork shoulder is very tough if you try to cook it quickly, but responds with a wonderful texture and flavor if it’s smoked slowly. The expression “pulled” means that the meat is not sliced but torn from the bone. In the case of pork shoulder, it comes off in lovely long morsels, perfect for sandwiches and not at all bad for a platter. Tongs are the usual tool for pulling the meat from the bone, but you can sometimes do it with a fork. Read More. . .

Read On...

Creole-Italian Pot Stickers
Pasta

Creole-Italian Pot Stickers

RecipeSquare-150x150 My son Jude developed an inexplicable love for Chinese pot stickers at a time in his life when his list of acceptable foods was so short that he was hard to feed. ¶ At Trey Yuen, one of our favorite Chinese places–he typically ate three full orders of the things, thereby outspending everyone else at the table combined. His record is 32 pot stickers. ¶ This is easy to understand. Good pot stickers are very good indeed. They’re Chinese ravioli, balls of meat with seasonings and vegetables wrapped in a noodle disk. ¶ First you steam them (after which they’re already pretty good) and then you fry them in a hot pan with a little oil. They’re easy to make, if time-consuming; we usually sit around the kitchen counter as a family and make several dozen of them at a time. Once they’re wrapped, you can freeze them to steam and fry later.
Read entire article.

Read On...

Peachy Grilled Pork Loin
Pork

Peachy Grilled Pork Loin

Peachy Grilled Pork Loin Pork loins lend themselves to sauces with a little sweet fruitiness. That quality can come from many places, but this recipe–inspired by a press release from the National Pork Board–uses peaches. Peaches? Why not? They’re good right now. 1 Tbs. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1 tsp. ground ginger 2 Tbs. olive oil 2 Tbs. cider vinegar 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/4 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. cocoa powder 3 tablespoons chili sauce 2 tsp. Tabasco garlic marinade 4 medium peaches, peeled and sliced, with all the juice…

Read On...

Andouille-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

RecipeSquare-150x150 Chef J.B. Holstein, who I have lost track of, won a national pork cook-off for this dish. It was great when he served it at Flagons, and I’ve made it at home many times. The pork is stuffed, grilled, then sauteed, and served atop a pile of greens cooked Southern-style. The dish involves a bit of work, but the results are spectacular.

You can make the act of stuffing the tenderloins easier by cutting a slit three-fourths of the way through from the side, and putting the stuffing in like in a poor boy sandwich. But you’ll have to tie the tenderloins closed, and it won’t look as good when it comes out.

Click here for recipe details.

Read On...

Pepper-Crusted Pork Loin with Sweet Heat Sauce

RecipeSquare-150x150

Click here for recipe details.

Read On...

Root Beer-Glazed Ham

RecipeSquare-150x150 This is without a doubt the most asked-for recipe in the seventeen-year history of my radio show. Demand for it rises during the holidays, but never goes away completely.
The root beer-glazed ham is a fixture on my table on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter. It’s in the oven all morning (good thing my turkey is usually out on the grill!), and it makes the whole house smell good. You’ll find that lots of your guests will fight over the black crusty parts of the ham. (And all the rest of it, too.)

Click here for recipe details.

Read On...

Pork Loin a l’Orange, Recipe

RecipeSquare-150x150 Inspired by the goodness of duck a l’orange and the late Chef Tom Cowman’s liver a l’orange, I’ve taken to making orange sauces for other meats. This one is a return to the old style of serving pork with sweet sauces–although this sauce isn’t as sweet as those from the 1950s. And the pepper level is higher. The perfect side dish with this is sweet potatoes. The sauce will be terrific with those.

Click here for recipe details.

Read On...

Chinese-Style Honey Spare Ribs

~~~
RecipeSquare-150x150 You see these on almost every Chinese restaurant’s appetizer menu. They’re sweet, but with a hard-to-place savory quality in the background. Spare ribs are the larger rib pieces that attach to the pork belly. They’re cut away from the part used for bacon, so they’re “spare.” Chinese cooks cut them into shorter pieces, but that’s a challenge at home; don’t bother. These ribs are sweet and rich, and are better as an appetizer than as an entree. The ingredients called for in the recipe can all be found in jars in the ethnic section of the supermarket. Read entire article.

Read On...

Pork Tenderloin with Mushrooms, Brandy Cream Sauce

RecipeSquare-150x150 Twice every summer, usually after a week of rain, a few bolete mushrooms come up in the woods around my house. When that happens, I make this dish. ¶ Pork tenderloins are lately much appreciated by cooks and eaters not only because of their great texture (it is the pork what a filet mignon is to beef), but also for their low fat content (less than skinless chicken). ¶ This dish fixes that fat issue by adding a very rich but supremely delicious cream sauce. Oh, well. Read entire article.

Read On...

Panneed Pork

RecipeSquare-150x150Some years ago, the annual March of Dimes Gourmet Gala took the form of a celebrity cooking competition, to which I was invited. My dish was panneed sweetbreads prepared with the sauce below. I won! As much as I like sweetbreads, I’m giving you this recipe with pork chops because a) sweetbreads are hard to find and fool with, and b) a lot of people don’t like sweetbreads. This pork chop takes on an amazing appearance after you pound it out; the bone almost looks ridiculous. Recipe details. . .

Read On...

Pork Tenderloin Diane

RecipeSquare-150x150 Steak Diane is a famous dish from the really old days, and persists in only the few restaurants that still perform a lot of tableside preparation. (Brennan’s is one.) I thought pork tenderloin might work with the recipe, and played around with it until it did. Beautifully and juicily. Recipe details. . .

Read On...

Pork Schnitzel

RecipeSquare-150x150 Sometimes rendered as “Vienna schnitzel,” this dish is from the city referred to in the name. Which I hope will banish forever any lingering idea you might have that this has anything to do with hot dogs. It’s really more like the familiar panneed meat we all grew up with in New Orleans. In its classic form, wiener schnitzel is made with veal. However, for some years now I’ve made it exclusively with pork loin, which I find much tenderer and more flavorful. Recipe details. . .

Read On...