Seared Scallops with Artichokes

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RecipeSquare-150x150 This is a signature dish at the Pelican Club, where Chef Richard Hughes calls it by the misleading name “scallop-stuffed artichoke.” It’s sophisticated in both flavor and appearance. It’s best made with dry-pack (also known as “day-boat”) scallops, which have not been processed for long shelf life. (The ones in the supermarket probably are not this kind.) Careful: don’t overcook the scallops! Use high heat and get them out of the pan while they’re still bulging.

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Oysters Roland
Oysters, Scallops, Mussels, Clams

Oysters Roland

Oysters Roland Roland Huet was one of the most skillful French chefs ever to work in New Orleans. Born and trained in the Loire Valley of France, he fetched up in the 1960s at Galatoire’s in the French Quarter. Chris Ansel–one of the family managers of Galatoire’s–left in the 1970s to open his own restaurant, Christian’s. Roland went with Chris, and created the menu that would make Christian’s an essential restaurant. On it was this baked oyster appetizer. It remained until the restaurant came to an end with Hurricane Katrina….

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Oysters and Pasta Creole Bordelaise
Oysters, Scallops, Mussels, Clams

Oysters and Pasta Creole Bordelaise

Oysters and Pasta Creole Bordelaise A delicious and very simple combination: spaghetti aglio olio (or “bordelaise,” as we call it in New Orleans) with fresh Louisiana oysters. The crushed red pepper develops as it cooks, and spreads warmth. 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 24 fresh large oysters 4 Tbs. butter 2 Tbs. finely-chopped fresh garlic 4 Tbs. finely chopped green onion tops 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper 1/4 tsp. salt 1 lb. vermicelli, cooked al dente 8 sprigs flat-leaf parsley, chopped 1. In a small skillet over medium-low flame, heat…

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Seared Sea Scallops With Lentils
* NOMenu.com

Seared Sea Scallops With Lentils

Sea scallops are the big ones–the bigger, the better. See if you can locate “diver” or “day boat” scallops, which have not been processed for shelf life. The lentils may not sound like a natural partner for scallops, but trust me: beans go brilliantly with seafood. This pairing is particularly good. Read More. . .

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Cajun Seared Scallops With Near-Guacamole
Oysters, Scallops, Mussels, Clams

Cajun Seared Scallops With Near-Guacamole

Save this recipe for occasions when you find those sea scallops that are almost the size of filet mignons. Sea scallops that size are wonderful, and lend themselves particularly to pan-searing. In our part of the world, this verges on blackening, and that’s just fine, assuming the pan is really hot and you don’t let the scallops sit there too long. They should bulge after cooking. 1 lb. sea scallops, the bigger the better Creole seasoning Salt 1/2 stick melted butter Sauce: 2 tomatillos, peeled and chopped 1 medium sweet…

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Mussels in Ghent-Style Wine Sauce
Oysters, Scallops, Mussels, Clams

Mussels in Ghent-Style Wine Sauce

RecipeSquare-150x150 The best mussels I ever ate were in a big restaurant (I don’t remember the name, but it was in the former town hall) in the center of Ghent in Belgium, on the third day of our honeymoon. They were awash in what they called a wine sauce, although it seemed more like a cream sauce to me. It’s a Belgian classic, and no place in the world is more enthusiastic about mussels than the Belgians. Read entire article.

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Oysters Ambrosia
Oysters, Scallops, Mussels, Clams

Oysters Ambrosia

RecipeSquare-150x150 This was created at Commander’s Palace by Sebastian “Chef Buster” Ambrosia, who might have the best name I ever heard for a chef. For many years, Chef Buster hosted a cooking show on WWL Radio. He served this dish in every restaurant he headed, and it was always the best dish in that restaurant at the time. It’s as Creole as something can be: seafood with a brown sauce. “It’s good, hearts!” as Chef Buster would say. Read entire article.

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Mussels With Chorizo
Oysters, Scallops, Mussels, Clams

Mussels With Chorizo

This doesn’t sound all that likely, but after sampling two completely different versions of it from two terrific chefs (Adolfo Garcia and Kevin Vizard, neither of whom is cooking for the public at the moment), I wanted to try my own hand. What you get is a sauce that has the flavor of the mussels in the front, a but more substance than what you get from mussel meat alone, and a lingering glow from. . . Read More. . .

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Coquille St. Jacques

RecipeSquare-150x150 With the advent of flown-in fresh seafood, we get beautiful day-boat scallops in New Orleans these days. (Scallops are not native to these parts.) Back in the old days, if you saw scallops at all it meant you were eating this classic dish. The old Arnaud’s was especially famous for it.

The sad fact was, however, that the only part of the scallop that was used to make the dish was the shell. The seafood that looked like scallops in the shell was usually some anonymous seafood cut into circles. Skate wings were particularly common for that purpose. (Now, interestingly, we’re seeing skate wings being served in some gourmet places under their own name.) If those really were scallops, they were the inferior little bay scallops.

I’ve thought for a long time that this old dish should be reinvented and returned to menus–scallop shell and all. In the meantime, make your own! Not too difficult, once you have good scallops in hand.

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Upside Down Broiled Oysters

RecipeSquare-150x150 Unless you have much heavier-duty cooking equipment than the average home cook, it’s impossible to duplicate Drago’s famous original char-broiled oysters, even if you have the recipe. The first challenge is getting and shucking the oysters. The second is to get enough heat coming from below to penetrate the shells and get their contents sizzling.

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Bouillabaisse New Orleans Style

RecipeSquare-150x150 Save this recipe for the day when you find yourself with a surplus of whole fresh fish. If you never have such a day, make crab or shrimp stock instead of the fish stock. The best fish to use, both for the stock and the big pieces that will make their way into the soup, are redfish, red snapper, drum, grouper, and lemonfish. Recipe details. . .

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Oysters Fonseca

Oysters Fonseca Oysters Fonseca is the third oyster in the trio of baked oysters at Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House. The other two, of course, are Rockefeller and Bienville. The third oyster–each version unique to the restaurants where they are found–is a long tradition among traditional New Orleans restaurant, but one not as common as it once was. That’s mainly because not nearly as many restaurant bake oysters with complicated toppings anymore, now that Drago’s char-broiled oysters have become so omnipresent. 2 oz. butter 2 ripe red bell peppers, chopped 2…

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Mussels Italian Style

Mussels Italian Style Mussels can be prepared in a wide variety of ways, but the two most common preparations with a cream-based white wine sauce or a tomato-based red sauce. Here’s how to make the latter. It begins in the market. Pay attention to the size of the mussel meats. If they’re very small they’re disappointing to eat. Ask before buying. Also, beware of bags of mussels with more than one or two open shells. Those are dead and must be thrown away. Mussels are inexpensive, so don’t hesitate to…

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Angels on Horseback

Angels on Horseback This is such a simple dish it almost doesn’t require a recipe, but enough people ask me about it that here it is. This is the perfect time of year to make this little pass-around appetizer, because the oysters are exceptionally meaty right now. In the days of Dickens, grand feasts would end with what was called the “savory”—a single bite of something smoky and salty. This dish is the classic savory course–especially when the meal began with oysters. 6 slices smoky bacon 12 large oysters 1….

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Oyster Rockefeller Flan

RecipeSquare-150x150

Oyster Rockefeller Flan

Every food writer of my generation has a Julia Child story. Mine involves this dish, the creation of Chef André Poirot at Begue’s at the Royal Sonesta Hotel in the 1980s. He cooked it for a small dinner attended by Julia Child and a few others. I sat across the table from her. When she sampled this appetizer, she called it, in her distinctive voice, “Divine! Very creative!” (We were not to hear any more such praise during the remainder of that meal.) A nonsweet custard holds together the traditional ingredients for oysters Rockefeller.

Full article>/h6>

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Italian Oysters

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Italian Oysters

After Bienville and Rockefeller, this garlic-and-bread-crumby concoction is the most popular in the pantheon of local oyster dishes. The famous dish along these lines is Oysters Mosca, named for the restaurant that made it popular. Every restaurant that’s even slightly Italianate makes a version of it, plus plenty of others. My version is a little spicier than most, inspired by the recipe they use at La Cuisine. The ideal side dish with this is spaghetti Bordelaise.

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Oysters Jean-Baptiste Reboul

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RecipeSquare-150x150 Although he has been gone from this world for over a decade, the influence Chef Chris Kerageorgiou has on New Orleans chefs remains strong. Here is a recipe that Chris named for one of his own inspirations. Jean-Baptiste Reboul was a chef in Marseilles–Chris’s home town–in the late 1800s and early 1900s. In his honor Chris created this baked oyster dish in the early years of his restaurant La Provence. It’s a classic restaurant recipe in that you can make the sauce well in advance, storing it in the refrigerator until needed. Then you spoon the sold sauce over the cold oyster and put a tray full of them into a hot oven until they bubble and brown. I hadn’t made this in a long time, but it’s still good. Read entire article.

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Oysters With Choucroute And Mornay Sauce

RecipeSquare-150x150 This dish unites two things that don’t sound like they belong together until you think about how good pickles and fried oysters taste on an oyster loaf. I’m just replacing the pickled cucumbers with pickled cabbage (“choucroute” is the lighter, softer French version of sauerkraut). And panneeing the oysters with a complicated crust instead of just frying them. With a little Mornay sauce on top. I thought I’d created something original, then learned that a classical French dish with the odd name “oysters Hambourgeoise” is somewhat similar. If oyster shells aren’t easily available, use gratin dishes. Read entire article.

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Cajun Seared Scallops With Near-Guacamole

RecipeSquare-150x150 Save this recipe for occasions when you find those sea scallops that are almost the size of filet mignons. Sea scallops that size are wonderful, and lend themselves particularly to pan-searing. In our part of the world, this verges on blackening, and that’s just fine, assuming the pan is really hot and you don’t let the scallops sit there too long. They should bulge after cooking.

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Oyster Boat

RecipeSquare-150x150 Lakeview Seafood was an old joint on the older road to the even older lakefront fishing-camp community of Little Woods. Its owner, Charlie Smith, was a former Marine Corps baker who had an interesting idea. Instead of serving the traditional oyster loaf on French bread, he baked a standard loaf of white bread, cut off the top, hollowed it out, buttered the inside, and filled it with fried seafood. He called these “boats,” and they were a big hit. The restaurant is long gone, and–more’s the pity–so is the fried seafood boat.

Unless you make one yourself. The bread is usually available from supermarkets with in-house bakeries, or you can bake the loaves yourself. Cutting the hollow is easier if you freeze the loaf first, but that’s not necessary. You can also make this great oversized sandwich with shrimp, catfish, or even small soft shell crabs. Read entire article.

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Clams Casino

RecipeSquare-150x150 A great dish found in every seafood and traditional Italian restaurant in the Northeast, clams casino is almost never encountered in New Orleans. I wish it were. It the best dish I ever had using clams. It’s also more than a little good with oysters (particularly smaller ones) or mussels. If you don’t have shells, you can make this equally well in small au gratin dishes. Read entire article.

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Creole Oyster Patties

RecipeSquare-150x150 Oyster patties are very popular at New Orleans parties as pass-around appetizers. They have a problem, however: most are terrible, because the sauce is too thick and rarely has a flavor much better than library paste. This recipe creates an oyster stew thick enough to stay inside the pastry, but with some flavor, too. There’s another issue: where to find the “patty shells” in which this concoction is baked and served. For generations, one went straight to McKenzie’s for these. McKenzie’s ain’t dere no more, but fear not: Dorignac’s bakery makes then, as does the Swiss Bakery on St. Charles Avenue downtown and quite a few other places. Read entire article.

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Sauteed Sea Scallops with Squid Ink Pasta
* Red Bean Edition

Sauteed Sea Scallops with Squid Ink Pasta

RecipeSquare-150x150 Sea scallops are the big ones–the bigger, the better. See if you can locate “diver” or “day boat” scallops, which have not been processed for shelf life. The squid ink pasta sounds exotic, but shouldn’t be too hard to track down in specialty stores and gourmet markets. You can swap out the major ingredients in this dish and still get great results. Normal, unflavored pasta in big pieces (penne, bowties, or corkscrews), cooked al dente would be fine. For that matter, there’s no law that says you have to use scallops; this would work well with shrimp, crawfish, lump crabmeat, or even big flakes of white fish. Read entire article.

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Creole Gratin of Oysters and Artichokes

RecipeSquare-150x150 Creole Gratin of Oysters and Artichokes

This recipe, created by Dave Carlson, came in second in an oyster-cooking competition a few years ago, sponsored by the Louisiana Seafood Marketing Board and Drago’s Restaurant. It’s a measure of how good the competition was that something this delicious would only come in second. (I thought it should have won.) Recipe details. . .

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