Salmon With Sweet And Spicy Glaze

RecipeSquare-150x150 My wife Mary Ann greatly enjoys a dish called barbecued salmon. It’s sort of a cross between smoking and grilling, with higher heat than you’d use for lox-style smoked salmon. It can be served hot or cold, usually with a sweet glaze with some zing. Someone gave me a side of salmon from an Alaskan trip a few years ago, and here’s what I came up with in this direction (after a few tries). Recipe details. . .

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Quiche Lorraine

RecipeSquare-150x150 This is one of the most delicate dishes I’ve ever eaten. The flavor of the fish is refined and carried on a cloudlike texture. It was created by and is the famous dish of L’Auberge de l’Ill, a three-star restaurant in Alsace, France. Their chef brought it with him to the fondly remembered Henri, where the food of L’Auberge de l’Ill was served. Thin, milder fish work best–particularly flounder, sea bass, and small drum. Read entire article.

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Grilled Coriander-Crusted Fish

The marinade for the fish is one that the late, great chef Gerard Crozier used to prepare for curing duck breasts. The flavor is quite powerful, especially if it’s left on for several days. I thought it would be great for escolar’s rich flavors, but with less time in the marinating bag. This recipe would also work well with tuna or swordfish. Read More. . .

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Blackened Tuna
* NOMenu.com

Blackened Tuna

Blackened Tuna There’s no better fish for blackening than tuna. By wonderful coincidence, no way of cooking tuna is better than blackening. The essential thing to know is that blackening fish creates a terrific amount of smoke and perhaps flames. It’s best done outdoors over a very hot fire. And don’t be shy about getting the heat up there–it can’t possibly be too hot. 4 tuna steaks, about 10 oz each, cut at least an inch thick (but the thicker, the better) 1/2 cup white wine 1 tsp. Worcestershire 2…

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Wild Alaska Salmon Kebabs With Rosemary And Lime
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Wild Alaska Salmon Kebabs With Rosemary And Lime

Wild Alaska Salmon Kebabs With Rosemary And Lime Wild-caught Alaskan king salmon is among the world’s best fish. It’s certainly the best salmon. When you encounter it (which we don’t often in New Orleans), bring it home and cook it almost any way you like. Here’s one way we did it at the Cool Water Ranch. I like salmon rare, which is the way these instructions get it. Mary Ann, of course, likes it well-done. No problem. Just leave the skewers destined for the well-done people on the grill or…

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Seared Salmon With Spinach And Beurre Blanc
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Seared Salmon With Spinach And Beurre Blanc

Seared Salmon With Spinach And Beurre Blanc The Steak Knife is an excellent Lakeview restaurant that has long been liked by its many regulars from the neighborhood. (Quite a few people from other parts of town make it there, too.) There’s much more to it than steaks. Owners Bob and Guy Roth include quite a bit of seafood in the Steak Knife’s menu. This dish isn’t on the menu anymore, but I always liked it. 10 oz. fresh spinach, washed and picked of large stems 3 Tbs. flour 3 Tbs….

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Grilled Lemonfish (Cobia)
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Grilled Lemonfish (Cobia)

Grilled Lemonfish (Cobia) Lemonfish–also known as cobia or ling–is a large, much-admired Gulf fish that also goes by the names cobia and ling. It is as good a grilling fish as I’ve ever encountered. When my son was a Boy Scout, during a campout we grilled a ten-pound slab of lemonfish over an open fire, coated only with Creole seasoning. It was unforgettable–tender, flavorful, and moist. 1 large lemonfish fillet, about 6-8 oz. per person, up to about 10 lbs. 2 lemons, quartered Creole seafood seasoning Salt 1. Wash the…

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Freshwater Trout Marigny
* Red Bean Edition

Freshwater Trout Marigny

RecipeSquare-150x150 This is a variation on the local classic trout Marguery, with a lighter and easier-to-make sauce. For once, this is a dish that’s designed to be made with true trout, rather than the good fish we called speckled trout around here. (You could use specks, but I think rainbow or ruby red trout or even salmon would be better.) Read entire article.

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Broiled Fresh Sardines
* Red Bean Edition

Broiled Fresh Sardines

RecipeSquare-150x150 Here is the Italian recipe for preparing fresh sardines. These are not the little fish in cans, but fresh, eight-inch long Mediterranean or Pacific sardines, four to six to the pound whole.Some people love them (I do), some people find them too strong in flavor. The problem is finding the fish themselves. Not even chefs can be assured of getting them regularly. They’re most popular around St. Joseph’s Day, but I order them whenever they turn up. Chefs Rene Bajeux and Andrea Apuzzo like them particularly and get them in more often than most. Two or three make a great appetizer. More to come. . .

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Sharpened Salmon.
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Sharpened Salmon.

RecipeSquare-150x150 I saw some beautiful center-cut fillets of fresh Scottish salmon early in a tour of the supermarket one day. As I wove in and out the aisles, a recipe formed. Thinly-sliced ham, I thought, would add an interesting flavor dimension. A crust broiled on top of the salmon would give some textural interest. But what will the crust be made of? Mustard and herbs crossed my mind, to which were soon added bread crumbs and the ham (which my brain by now had sliced into ribbons the size of fettuccine. It was all marvelous. If only I were this creative every day.

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Summertime Swordfish
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Summertime Swordfish

Although the availability of fresh swordfish in our part of the world is sporadic–the species’ population was threatened for awhile a few years ago–it still turns up in restaurants and occasionally in seafood markets. Or you might have a friend who caught one. Swordfish are huge and their fillets are usually cut into steaks, like tuna, about three-quarters of an inch to a full inch thick . It needs to be cooked a little longer than fresh tuna, but not until it’s gray all the way through; that will make it tough and unappealing. I find it’s best when grilled, and then allowed to cool off before serving. Cold garnishes like corn, fresh peppers (hot or sweet or both) and diced tomato and avocado can turn it into a semi-salad–great during the summer. Read More. . .

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Fresh Tuna (Or Salmon) Fajitas
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Fresh Tuna (Or Salmon) Fajitas

Fresh Tuna Fajitas One day when I had a surplus of gorgeous fresh tuna on hand, I sliced it up and proceeded as if it were beef in a standard fajitas presentation. It worked better than I thought it would, and it was a lot tenderer. This also works very well with fresh salmon. 1/4 cup vegetable oil 1 lb. fresh tuna, cut into slices about 1/2 inch wide and 1/4 inch thick 1 red bell pepper, seeds and membrane removed, cut into strips 1 yellow bell pepper, seeds and…

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Smoked Salmon Pizza
Tuna, Salmon And The Like

Smoked Salmon Pizza

Smoked Salmon Pizza This is a great light, small pizza, designed to be an appetizer. Be sure to use a first-class smoked salmon; the less-good kinds wind up tasting too salty. Alternatively, if you have some hot-smoked salmon at hand (it tastes like it was grilled a bit, on top of the hot smoke), you will find that works well for pizza. Crust (makes about six pizzas): 3 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. salt 2 oz. olive oil 1 cup warm water 2 packages active dry yeast 1 Tbs. sugar…

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Seared Tuna With Tomato-Lemon Vinaigrette

Seared Tuna With Tomato-Lemon Vinaigrette This is a dish popular at Gautreau’s in the 1990s, involving tuna cut into thick blocks. instead of slices. It was finished almost in the style of a salad. I add my own variations on the idea whenever I get my hands on really thick pieces of tuna. It’s always almost raw at the center, and therefore looks magnificent. Don’t hesitate to use different salad ingredients from the ones here. Vinaigrette: 1 tsp. Dijon mustard 2 Tbs. lemon juice 1 Tbs. white wine vinegar 1/4…

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Grilled Wahoo With Orange-Soy Sauce

Grilled Wahoo With Orange-Soy Sauce The meaty wahoo is a relative of tuna, and is a favorite catch of Gulf of Mexico fishermen. The story is that it got the name from the shouts of excitement when a fisherman reels in a wahoo. It’s a great fish for cooking, too, lending itself particularly well to high-heat techniques like grilling and blackening. It’s also a natural for Asian-style sauces like this one. It pairs the firmness of the meat with crisp vegetables and a sharp, low-calorie sauce. Marinade: 3 Tbs. sugar…

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Grilled Tuna With Orange-Soy Sauce

Grilled Tuna With Orange-Soy Sauce Fresh tuna from the Gulf of Mexico is a staple of seafood cooking around New Orleans. It’s a great fish that lends itself particularly well to high-heat techniques like grilling and blackening. It’s also a natural for Creole-Asian sauces like this one. The important thing to remember about tuna is that its texture becomes like rubber if you cook it too long. Leave it a little red at the center–like a medium-rare steak. This recipe pairs the natural juiciness of tuna with some crisp vegetables…

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Tuna Rockefeller

RecipeSquare-150x150 This dish is not often seen in restaurants, even though it’s a natural. With the tuna seared rare and the Rockefeller sauce put down in a thin layer under it (resist the temptation to pile it on top), it give not only a great flavor but a unique one with a great aroma.

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Pan-Roasted Salmon With Herb Crust

RecipeSquare-150x150 My badly-written notes tell me that I had this dish at Commander’s Palace when Emeril Lagasse was still the chef there. I saw how it was done, and reconstructed it from memory. Don’t blame Emeril for the execution–if that issue even comes up. Actually, this is our favorite way to prepare salmon at home. Read entire article.

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Rainbow Trout With Shrimp Veloute

RecipeSquare-150x150 Rainbow trout is not often seen in New Orleans, where the word “trout” implies speckled sea trout, a salt-water fish. Rainbow trout is a member of the salmon family, and comes from fresh water streams in the West. The flavor is totally different from that of speckled trout, but good in its way. Rainbow trout and the related steelhead trout are often seen in supermarkets, and even in some local restaurants (Zea, notably). This dish is an unusual blending of the out-of-town fish with a very New Orleans stuffing. It also works very well with small whole flounder. Read entire article.

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Char-Grilled Tuna

RecipeSquare-150x150 I can sum up my approach to tuna simply: I treat it as if it were a steak. When I’m finished with it in this recipe, it even looks like a steak. The exterior is crusty and dark brown to black, and the inside is red and juicy. It’s almost (but not quite) blackened. Take it off the grill at the first moment you wonder whether it’s done. It will be perfect then. The ideal side dish for this is–believe it or not–red beans and rice. Read entire article.

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Salmon Florentine

RecipeSquare-150x150 The color contrast of the green spinach with the pink-orange salmon is almost absurdly inviting. But the flavor of spinach and a good quality fresh salmon is itself very appealing. For this dish, locate the thickest salmon fillets you can, remove all the skin (not as hard as it looks–just have a sharp knife handy), and broil it just until it’s warm all the way though. Read entire article.

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Fire-Roasted Salmon

RecipeSquare-150x150 Spring and early summer are the best times to eat salmon in New Orleans. This is the time of year when Pacific salmon becomes available. Even though it’s not a local fish, it’s so good and so unique in so many ways that we can’t ignore it. ¶ This is my favorite way to prepare salmon, one I’ve seen in two disparate places: Scandinavia (Sweden and Finland) and California (at the Meadowood Resort). The whole side of salmon is tied to a grill (in one case, a grill made of wooden poles). Then it’s propped up in front of a hot fire–on the ground, or in a fireplace. More to come. . .

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Pan-Grilled Monkfish With Mardi Gras Vegetables

RecipeSquare-150x150 Here’s a basic recipe for grilling thick fish, applied to thick fillets of monkfish–a very firm, white fish with a texture that reminds many eaters of lobster. It doesn’t taste like lobster, but it is a very fine fish. While the instructions below are for grilling, this is also a very good fish for broiling. The garnish is a pile of colorful shredded vegetables, cooked just long enough to take out the stiffness. This dish also works well with other species that lend themselves to the grill. Tuna, swordfish, redfish, mahi-mahi, escolar and lemonfish come to mind. More to come. . .

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