Joey K’s. Uptown: 3001 Magazine. 504-891-0997.

#29 Among The 33 Best Seafood Eateries

It’s a classic New Orleans casual menu that stops short of being a cliche. They take all of the cooking seriously, something best seen in the daily specials. Many customers know exactly which day to be there for what. Portions are almost grossly oversize, and if that’s not enough, they have an all-you-can-eat catfish deal that runs every day. Despite that, seafood in general is a strong suit here. More to come. . .

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Brothers. Harvey: 1502 Lapalco Blvd. 504-366-1073.

he problem with the suburbs is that they don’t have neighborhoods the way the city does. Nobody walks anywhere. So not many neighborhood restaurants get off the ground. This one did. It’s been a popular eatery almost since the day Lapalco Boulevard was opened to traffic. It’s been around long enough to have become legendary among West Bankers. The menu is pure New Orleans everyday eating: poor boy sandwiches, fried seafood platters, red beans on Monday, gumbo, bread pudding. And breakfast. More to come. . .

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Mena’s Palace. French Quarter: 200 Chartres. 504-525-0217.

It doesn’t look like it’s going to be good, but it is. And has been for a long time, even as it’s evolved from a workingman’s restaurant into a place that catches a lot of tourists. The visitors could do a lot worse. Here they will get very good platters of the local everyday-dining staples from long ago. Red beans, fried seafood, stuffed peppers, pastas with all kinds of sauces, big salads, and poor boy sandwiches. Full Review. . .

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Remoulade. French Quarter: 309 Bourbon. 504-523-0377.

Remoulade ANECDOTES AND ANALYSIS Arnaud’s–a major old-line establishment–bought an old jazz club adjacent to its front dining room, and turned it into a casual, inexpensive, all-day cafe. The place does a take on the tiled floors, mirrored walls, and light-bulb rows of the mother restaurant, but with a much looser style. The menu offers a dozen or so dishes from the kitchen of Arnaud’s. The best of these are the soups and the famous namesake dish–the cold, tangy shrimp remoulade. The remoulade sauce, which is easily obtainable no matter what…

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Arabi Food Store. Arabi: 650 Friscoville Ave. 504-277-2333.

Arabi Food Store Arabi: 650 Friscoville Ave. 504-277-2333. Map. Very Casual. AE MC V Website WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY The name is misleading, but tells a familiar story. Many great sandwich shops around New Orleans began as neighborhood grocery stores with delis that produced sandwiches as a sideline. As supermarkets made it harder for corner groceries to survive, they evolved into inexpensive neighborhood eateries. The Arabi Food Store is a classic example of this, with excellent everyday sandwiches and a few platters. WHAT’S GOOD The place opens for a simple but…

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Munch Factory. Lakefront/UNO Area: 6325 Elysian Fields Ave. 504-324-5372.

Munch Factory Lakefront/UNO Area: 6325 Elysian Fields Ave. 504-324-5372. Map.Casual.AE DS MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY My favorite kind of restaurant discovery has a menu full of new dishes, all of which are nevertheless immediately recognizable as coming from a Creole sensitivity. I was not expecting that from the Munch Factory, whose name and premises suggest burgers, salads, and simple platters. It has all of that, but a quick perusal of the menu reveals many more, much more interesting choices. Somebody in the kitchen clearly understands the New Orleans palate,…

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Audubon Clubhouse Cafe. Uptown: 6500 Magazine. 504-212-5282.

Audubon Clubhouse Cafe Uptown 3: Napoleon To Audubon: 6500 Magazine. 504-212-5282. Map.Casual.AE DC DS MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY The setting in the center of the gigantic oaks of the Audubon Park golf course is highly appealing. Some people come here before or after a round of golf, but others are there to be there. Club membership isn’t required. WHAT’S GOOD The breakfast cooks work just a small notch above the basics. The menu is abetted by a small buffet, which persists through the lunch hour. Beyond that, the lunch…

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Cafe Hope. Marrero: 1101 Barataria Blvd. 504-756-4673.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Cafe Hope. Marrero: 1101 Barataria Blvd. 504-756-4673.

Cafe Hope Marrero To Lafitte: 1101 Barataria Blvd. 504-756-4673. Map.Casual.AE MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY All you really need to know about Cafe Hope is that the food is astonishingly excellent, served at prices that seem laughably low. It’s right up to the times in style, using interesting recipes and fresh local foodstuffs. What you might want to know is that all of this is cooked by people whose lives recently passed through a tight spot, and who are working to get into the mainstream. The latter perspective is the…

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Dooky Chase. Mid-City: 2301 Orleans Ave. 504-821-0600.
Chicken

Dooky Chase. Mid-City: 2301 Orleans Ave. 504-821-0600.

Dooky Chase Mid-City: 2301 Orleans Ave. 504-821-0600. Map.Casual.AE DC MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY Nobody understands Creole cooking better than Leah Chase, who built her restaurant into one of the country’s most famous. For half a century, this has been the Galatoire’s of the African American community, and the place where everyone–including Presidents and every other kind of celebrity–goes for the cooking of the Creoles of color. New Orleans cooking crosses racial lines without really acknowledging them, uniting rather than dividing the community. WHAT’S GOOD This is the real deal:…

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Come Back Inn. Metairie: 8016 W Metairie Ave. 504-467-9316.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Come Back Inn. Metairie: 8016 W Metairie Ave. 504-467-9316.

Come Back Inn Metairie 3: Houma Blvd To Kenner Line: 8016 W Metairie Ave. 504-467-9316. Map.Casual.MC V WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY The only restaurant in a wide circle centered on the intersection of West Metairie and David Drive, the Come Back Inn has a big population of local people on which to draw. It has served them well enough to stay busy most of the time, with a mix of working people at lunch and family types at dinner. They eat generous platters of standard New Orleans dishes, poor boys, and…

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Willie Mae’s Scotch House. Mid-City: 2401 St Ann. 504-822-9503.
Chicken

Willie Mae’s Scotch House. Mid-City: 2401 St Ann. 504-822-9503.

Willie Mae’s Scotch House Mid-City: 2401 St Ann. 504-822-9503. Map.Very Casual.MC V WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY This is a very small neighborhood place specializing in fried chicken and a handful of other Creole dishes. After the hurricane, it became the darling of the national media, whose image of New Orleans eating it fit perfectly. (The fact that few people in New Orleans had so much as heard of the place didn’t deter them.) Suddenly everybody who came to town felt it essential to eat there. The little place was overwhelmed, and…

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Pontchartrain Po-Boys. Mandeville: 318 Dalwill Dr. 985-626-8188.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Pontchartrain Po-Boys. Mandeville: 318 Dalwill Dr. 985-626-8188.

Pontchartrain Po-Boys Mandeville: 318 Dalwill Dr. 985-626-8188. Map.Casual.AE DS MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY The best culinary development on the North Shore in the twenty-three years I’ve lived there is the proliferation of old-style neighborhood cafes. They’re usually in strip malls instead of in the neighborhoods, but the food is immediately recognizable as bone-fide everyday New Orleans eats. This well-hidden cafe is one of the better such additions to the scene, with first-class poor boys and the classic platters. WHAT’S GOOD This is a serious kitchen that cooks all the…

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Cafe Reconcile. Lee Circle Area: 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. 504-568-1157.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Cafe Reconcile. Lee Circle Area: 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. 504-568-1157.

Cafe Reconcile Warehouse District & Center City: 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. 504-568-1157. Map.Very CasualMC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY Which is the better story: the food in this insanely inexpensive, sparkling center-city cafe? Or its lofty reason for being? Cafe Reconcile is an excellent neighborhood cafe, with a menu of Creole home-style dishes, prepared under the guidance of major restaurant professionals. But the people who work there are young people whose lives are at risk for a host of reasons, ranging from absent parents to crime. They receive training from…

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Gumbo Shop. French Quarter: 630 St. Peter. 504-525-1486.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Gumbo Shop. French Quarter: 630 St. Peter. 504-525-1486.

Gumbo Shop French Quarter: 630 St Peter. 504-525-1486. Map.Casual.AE DC DS MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY With the best name ever attached to a New Orleans restaurant, the Gumbo Shop sounds, looks, and is a great place to eat the Creole classics. Not only do they cook very well here, but prices are much lower than you’d expect for a place in such a prime tourist location. WHAT’S GOOD It’s not the best gumbo in town, but it is pretty good, and what it lacks in brilliance they make up…

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Coffee Pot. French Quarter: 714 St. Peter. 504-524-3500.
Breakfast & Brunch

Coffee Pot. French Quarter: 714 St. Peter. 504-524-3500.

Coffee Pot French Quarter: 714 St Peter. 504-524-3500. Map.Casual.AE MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY It serves terrific breakfasts with a Creole flavor all day, every day. Most important, it’s the last stand for calas–Creole rice cakes, once a familiar local treat, now gone from everywhere but here. After breakfast, it functions as a neighborhood restaurant for Quarterites, but one that gets a lot of out-of-towners. WHAT’S GOOD The menu is a collection of New Orleans culinary cliches, but despite the touristy location (next to Pat O’Brien’s), the Coffee Pot comes…

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Praline Connection. Marigny: 542 Frenchmen. 504-943-3934.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Praline Connection. Marigny: 542 Frenchmen. 504-943-3934.

Praline Connection Marigny: 542 Frenchmen. 504-943-3934. Map.CasualAE DC DS MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY The divide between soul food and the rest of New Orleans Creole food is so faint that not much of value comes from trying to detect it. That said, the Praline Connection is unambiguously on the African-American side, cooking many dishes not often found in the mainstream Creole places anymore. And they do indeed make their own excellent pralines. WHAT’S GOOD No fussiness or pretension: here is delicious, hearty, fresh, well-seasoned home cooking with an unmistakable…

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Marigny Brasserie. Marigny: 640 Frenchmen. 504-945-4472.
Creole Homestyle Restaurants

Marigny Brasserie. Marigny: 640 Frenchmen. 504-945-4472.

Marigny Brasserie Marigny: 640 Frenchmen. 504-945-4472. Map.CasualAE DC DS MC VWebsite WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY In its seventeen years, the Marigny Brasserie has evolved more than any other eatery in the trendy Marigny Triangle. In its first incarnations, it purveyed hip, gourmet Creole bistro-style cooking. But in 2008 owner Roland Adams started over from scratch, and shifted the style to that of a neighborhood cafe–albeit a modern one. This boosted volume tremendously, particularly among out-of-towners. However, it brought down the interest level of the food. (And the prices.) An old story….

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