3 Fleur
EntreePrice-25
BreakfastNo Breakfast SundayNo Breakfast MondayNo Breakfast TuesdayNo Breakfast WednesdayNo Breakfast ThursdayNo Breakfast FridayNo Breakfast Saturday
LunchNo Lunch SundayLunch MondayLunch TuesdayLunch WednesdayLunch ThursdayLunch FridayLunch Saturday
DinnerNo Dinner SundayDinner MondayDinner TuesdayDinner WednesdayDinner ThursdayDinner FridayDinner Saturday

Cochon

Warehouse District: 930 Tchoupitoulas. 504-588-2123. Map.
Casual.
AE DC DS MC V
Website

ANECDOTES AND ANALYSIS
Visitors to New Orleans walk away from Cochon satisfied, as do younger New Orleans diners. Both groups may be eating these dishes for the first times in their lives. Those of us who grew up with the stuff might be less impressed. There is no question that Cochon makes credible versions of the country-style Cajun meat dishes. I love beans and ham hocks as much as anybody else born on Mardi Gras. I love poor boys, too, but there’s only so far up the ladder that everyday dishes can go. I guess what I’m saying is that Cochon–despite its popularity, is not the kind of dining experience I’d call unforgettable. You’d have a better shot at that in Cochon’s deli-like junior partner next door, Butcher.

Cochon and cracklings.

Cochon and cracklings.

WHY IT’S NOTEWORTHY
Cochon fills a niche that, in New Orleans, went begging for attention for decades. Inspired by the many small butcher shops found throughout in Cajun country (but rare in the New Orleans area), it cures and smokes its own meats and sausages. With that resource Cochon creates a unique menu. It’s related to but different from barbecue. This is home-style Cajun cooking, but the kind made from smoky-cured meats. There are seafood dishes, but they’re in the minority on the menu. The result is convincingly Cajun and distinctive, if not memorable.

Hamhock, okra and beans.

Hamhock, okra and beans.

WHAT’S GOOD
The French word “cochon” refers to the pig, particularly the tender young pigs that Cajun cooks relish in their cookery. Cochon’s kitchen starts with the best possible pork and other meats, and carefully performs with great care the time-consuming, careful process of turning it into andouille, boudin, cochon de lait and dozens of other specialties. The abbreviated menu is riddled with high miscellany: pig’s ears (really–not the pastries called pig’s ears), rabbit livers, pork cheeks, and alligator, to name a few. Preparations and sides are thoroughly country in style. All of this convinces visitors from other places that they are eating real Louisiana food–and they are.

Stephen Stryjewski, co-owner and chef.

Stephen Stryjewski, co-owner and chef.

BACKSTORY
Co-owner and chef Donald Link grew up in westernmost Acadiana, and from the day he began cooking (in his teens) he wanted to build a menu around the Cajun butcher shop. Before he finally did, he went back and forth in the 1990s between New Orleans and San Francisco, winding up as sous chef at Bayona. In 2000, Susan Spicer and Link partnered in Herbsaint, a very successful French-Louisiana bistro that Link now owns–along with Cochon, Butcher, and Peche. He was assembling Cochon when Hurricane Katrina brought everything to a halt. He finally opened it in 2006–the first major new restaurant in New Orleans after the storm.

Cochon-Ext

DINING ROOM
It’s a former factory, with floors of bare concrete and a battered brick wall along the sidewalk. The rest of the design has an almost Scandinavian look, with varnished, horizontal wood along the back walls. Tall ceilings, interesting lighting, an open kitchen with a food bar, and even a nice treatment of the sidewalk at the entrance (with a few tables out there) complete a handsome, casual environment. The chairs, with their slatted, flat seats, are not comfortable for long dinners.

FULL ONLINE MENU

BEST DISHES
Starters
Wood-fired oysters, chili garlic butter
Fried livers with pepper jelly and toast
Smoked pork ribs, watermelon pickle
Fried boudin, pickled peppers
Panneed pork cheeks, creamed corn & shaved chilies
Boucherie plate
Carrot, cauliflower, raisin salad, curry mayonnaise & pecans

Entrees
Catfish courtbouillon
Smoked ham hock, stewed peas, green beans, onions
Louisiana cochon, turnips, cabbage and cracklings
Rabbit and dumplings,
Oven-roasted Gulf fish, fisherman’s style
Braised beef short rib, horseradish potato salad
Oyster and bacon sandwich

Desserts
Butterscotch pudding, toasted pecan shortbread
German chocolate cake
Pineapple upside-down cake, cherry sherbet, dulce de leche
Lemon meringue pie, crème fraise crust

FOR BEST RESULTS
Listen carefully for specials, which can increase the range of the menu substantially. A meal made entirely from small plates and sides is a good plan. The restaurant has received so much national attention that it’s very busy in time of heavy tourism. I would not come here at any time without a reservation.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT
The menu needs more variety in the entree department. More than a few dishes here seem to be more about making a menu statement than providing a good eat. (The smoked hamhock with okra and blackeye peas is a prime example.)

FACTORS OTHER THAN FOOD
Up to three points, positive or negative, for these characteristics. Absence of points denotes average performance in the matter.

  • Dining Environment +1
  • Consistency +2
  • Service+2
  • Value
  • Attitude +1
  • Wine & Bar +1
  • Hipness +3
  • Local Color +1

 

SPECIAL ATTRIBUTES

  • Sidewalk tables
  • Many private rooms
  • Open Monday lunch and dinner
  • Open till 11 p.m. FR SA
  • Open all afternoon
  • Reservations recommended

 

No comments yet.

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?