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Pork Tenderloin Diane

Steak Diane is a famous dish from the really old days, and persists in only the few restaurants that still perform a lot of tableside preparation. (Brennan’s is one.) I thought pork tenderloin might work with the recipe, and played around with it until it did. Beautifully and juicily.

  • 2 whole pork tenderloins
  • 2 Tbs. Creole seasoning
  • 2 Tbs. butter
  • 1 oz. Bourbon
  • 1 Tbs. lemon juice, strained
  • 3 Tbs. Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 Tbs. Tabasco Caribbean-style steak sauce, or Pickapeppa
  • 1 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1/3 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 tsp. coarsely-cracked black pepper
  • 1 Tbs. French shallots, very finely chopped
Nouvelle steak Diane.

Nouvelle steak Diane.

1. Slice the tenderloins about an inch thick, and season with Creole seasoning.

2. Heat the butter in a skillet over medium heat, and sauté the pork until browned on each side. Remove and keep warm.

3. Add the Bourbon to the pan and bring to a boil, whisking to dissolve the browned bits. Add the lemon juice, Worcestershire, steak sauce, and mustard. Stir and cook for a minute, then add the cream. Lower the heat to a simmer.

4. Return the pork to the pan and cook to heat through while coating the pieces with sauce.

5. Place the tenderloin slices on plates, nap with a little extra sauce (if there is any), and top with a light sprinkle of chopped shallots and pepper.

Serves six.

2 Readers Commented

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  1. Tom on January 7, 2015

    That dish looks wonderful but is that the correct accompanying picture?
    Not to be a smart-aleck but how do you get grill marks on the pork if you’re sautéing in a pan?

    • Tom Fitzmorris on January 7, 2015

      The recipe begins by noting that steak Diane is the classic Diane dish, and the photo caption says that this is steak Diane. I don’t have a photo of the pork version. (I developed the recipe quite some time ago.) I am always amazed by how much detailed attention our readers give to our poor work here.

      Tastefully yours,
      Tom Fitzmorris

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